Posts Tagged ‘ glassware ’

beer.gifts: for the beer enthusiast


Just because Black Friday is three days away doesn’t mean that you  shouldn’t start dropping hints today.

 

Beer Certificates: Go to your LOCAL (not big box franchise super mart) beer store and purchase a gift certificate.  If they don’t sell gift certificates buy a beer and make your own gift certificate label at home and wrap that around the bottle.

 

Beer Bouquet: Yes there are the usual Budmiloors type of beers but don’t give up just yet.  You can get a personalized team NFL bouquet with Magic Hat, Boulevard, Deschutes or Brooklyn!  Now that is a beerquet!

 

Kegerator: Now theses are some fancy kegerators.  You may be able to find a better deal on refrigerators but you can get the rest of your tap gadgets here.

 

Beer glasses: Don’t underestimate the shock and awe ability of glasses.  Not only are they cool looking and fun to drink out of they really do accentuate the beer inside!

 

Beer Clubs: What a great gift to broaden anyones appreciation of beer!

 

Beer Gear: A shameless self promotion to say the least but it won’t take long for you to find the right gear by doing a Google search.

 

 

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Beer Gear


If I’m not writing about or drinking beer you can bet  I am illustrating beer. Now you can buy some really cool beer gear with a HopHeadSaid logo or one of my other unique beer illustrations printed on it.  You can get nearly any combination of the following so visit my store for specifics @ http://www.cafepress.com/HopHeadSaid_Merchandise 

Shirts:

Men's T-shirt Wormen's t-shirt Women's Tank Men's Polo

Fun Stuff:

Pint Glass  iPhone 3 Case BEER clock

Stationary/Prints/Posters

Journal BEER print Magnet BEER note card

 

animated gif

The Perfect Pint: Specialty Glasses


In an effort to expand on the “education” part of my “Beer Reviews, Education and Nonsense” motto, I am continuing my series of posts that will focus on beer glassware.  Specifically, I will be talking about the glass’s shape and why that particular glass is an appropriate vessel for a specific beer style.

This week I will be discussing “True” specialty glasses.  So far I have been talking in general terms about style appropriate glassware and how they can accentuate the beers that have been poured into them.  On the other hand, “True” specialty glasses are usually specific to one brewery or even one beer.  These glasses come in many different sizes and shapes and are only limited by the imagination of the designer.

Specialty Glass

Specialty Glass

Often, specialty  glasses have a unique story behind them.  My first true specialty glass was a Kwak glass, see illustration.  This glass is a perfect example of specialty glasses because of its unique shape and accessory not to mention a great origin story.  I won’t go into the story here but you will be able to find the story with a quick internet search.

Finding the correct beer for these glasses shouldn’t be too hard.  The glasses usually have the appropriate beer or brewery name on them and often they are sold as gift packs that contain the glass and a few beers as well.  As with any glass, you can drink any beer you want to out of these glasses and you may want to as the appropriate beer may be cost prohibitive to drink on a regular basis.

The Perfect Pint: Snifter


In an effort to expand on the “education” part of my “Beer Reviews, Education and Nonsense” motto, I am continuing my series of posts that will focus on beer glassware.  Specifically, I will be talking about the glass’s shape and why that particular glass is an appropriate vessel for a specific beer style.

The Snifter is my second favorite glass style. Its elegant shape is comfortable to hold, beautiful to look at and allows BIG beers to warm while you drink them.  This warming facilitates the release of carbon dioxide which carries with it the subtle or not so subtle aromas throughout the drinking session.

Snifter

Snifter

Snifters are ideal for glasses for beers that have high alcohol levels as their small size encourages moderation.  Snifters also make wonderful tasters because their small size and large bowl allow small amounts of beer to be agitated easily without spilling.  The agitation releases the aromatics from that small amount of beer which are then captured and corralled by the shape of the glass.  The only thing left to do is stick your nose deep inside the glass and enjoy a condensed aroma.

perfect.pint: Goblet


In an effort to expand on the “education” part of my “Beer Reviews, Education and Nonsense” motto, I am continuing my series of posts that will focus on beer glassware.  Specifically, I will be talking about the glass’s shape and why that particular glass is an appropriate vessel for a specific beer style.

This week I will be discussing my very first “specialty” glass the goblet, an Orval goblet to be more precise. This is a well made sturdy glass with the Orval Monastery logo of a fish and ring on it.  Ten years ago, I had to special order Orval and have it shipped to me directly from Belgium if I wanted to taste its special blend of sweet, sour and spice.   Nowadays you will be able to find Orval and its matching glass in any self-respecting beer store. If you were going to purchase a goblet, I would recommend this particular glass simply because I have had it for at least ten years and except for the fading logo (I recommend hand washing this glass) it still looks new.

goblet

Goblet

Belgian ales (specifically Abbey or Trappist) are commonly served in goblets because their smaller size, usually 10 or 11 oz, moderates consumption of these bigger or higher ABV beers. Belgian ales are brewed to be consumed warmer than most other styles so don’t worry about that cold beer warming up in your hand while you drink it. The goblet has a nice bowl shape that fits comfortably into the palm of your hand for a reason, to warm it up. So feel free to cup your goblet in your hands while you enjoy your next Abbey or Trappist ale and note how the flavors and aromas change as your beer warms.

I don’t recommend goblets for many other beers simply because of their wide mouth which may be second only to the nonic pint glass in terms of surface area. Only a highly carbonated, full flavored beer will be able to hold any kind of head in that glass.

The Perfect Pint: Tulip Glass


In an effort to expand on the “education” part of my “Beer Reviews, Education and Nonsense” motto, I am continuing my series of posts that will focus on beer glassware.  Specifically, I will be talking about the glass’s shape and why that particular glass is an appropriate vessel for a specific beer style.

This week I will be discussing my favorite glass style the tulip. Its elegant yet functional shape will enhance almost any beer and in my opinion, it is as close to the perfect glass as you can get.  I have several of them in my cupboard now and they are used almost exclusively.  The only time I stray from using this glass is if I am enjoying a weissbier (not big enough to hold that enormous wheat head) or a lager (the thin walls allow this beer to warm a too quickly).

Tulip Glass

Tulip Glass

Tulip glasses can come in a variety of sizes and have either a wide or narrow “bowl” that sits on top of a stemmed foot. The defining characteristic of a tulip glass is in the top third where the glass gently tapers in and then flares out at the opening.  Without the flare the glass would be called a snifter. The taper helps create a dense head and the flared opening fits the lips nicely. Some tulip glasses even have a small laser etching at the bottom of the bowl which causes a constant stream of bubbles to cascade to the surface. 

Any beer looks beautiful in a tulip but be careful when pouring a bottle conditioned beer into one of these glasses.  The yeast sediment at the bottom of these bottles is easily agitated and will cloud up the beer quickly preventing you from enjoying the crystal clear presentation your beer deserves.

The Perfect Pint: Pint Glasses


In an effort to expand on the “education” part of my “Beer Reviews, Education and Nonsense” motto, I am continuing my series of posts that will focus on beer glassware.  Specifically, I will be talking about the glass’s shape and why that particular glass is an appropriate vessel for a specific beer style.

This week I will be discussing a glass that has become ubiquitous with pubs, bars and restaurants, the pint glass.  There are several names (Nonic, shaker and tumbler) and slight shape differences but they are basically the same glass. Pint glasses are the gold standard of beer glasses for home and commercial use with good reason.  They are cheap and can be replaced easily.  They are easy to clean and store because of their no-nonsense shapes and.   These glasses are sturdy and can take a beating before they break.  Most importantly to many beer drinkers, they provide a historical standard for individual beer consumption. With exception of the historical measurement (which isn’t even accurate these days) these glasses have little to do with enhancing the overall drinking experience and more to do with convenience to the establishment’s owner.

Pint glasses are hardly the BEST glass for any beer.  True, they fit in the hand nicely and their wide openings facilitate easy drinking, however, the wide openings do nothing to condense the foamy head.  A thick and dense head on a beer works as a filter allowing a gradual release of aromatics.  The relatively large surface area at the top of pint glass encourages a thin head which allows the aromatics to escape quickly and easily. 

Because of their size, only low to mid strength beers should be served in a pint glass.  Beers with higher alcohol levels should be consumed in moderation and in smaller serving sizes.

Nonic Pint

Nonic Pint

Shaker Pint

Shaker Pint

Pint Glasses: Nonic, Shaker or Tumbler
The workhorse of glasses. Traditionally used
for any American or English ale.