perfect.pint: Weizen Glasses


In an effort to expand on the “education” part of my “Beer Reviews, Education and Nonsense” motto, I am continuing my series of posts that will focus on beer glassware.  Specifically, I will be talking about the glass’s shape and why that particular glass is an appropriate vessel for a specific beer style.

Weizen is the German word for wheat and whenever you see a beer that has weizen in the name you know that wheat is the primary grain used to make the beer.  German versions can have a banana and/or a clove aroma which are produced by the yeast during fermentation. American versions generally use yeast that produces little, if any fruity esters. American versions may have a subtle floral aroma which is derived from the hops used during brewing.

weizen glass

Weizen glasses have similar geometries to pilsner glasses; they are tall slender glasses with a heavy foot for stability.  Unlike the pilsner, a weizen glass bulges out towards the top and tapers in at the opening. For my money, no other glass is a worthy vessel for weizens or other wheat beers.  The glass’s shape showcases the cloudy golden beauty of any wheat beer while their size accommodates the substantial heads wheat beers produce.

Simply put, this glass creates a piece of delicious performance art.

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  1. What does the bulge do for your experience? Is it purely aesthetic or does it change the flavor experience?

    • I almost wrote about the shape and talked myself out of it. Below is an explanation of the “bulge”.

      The shape is quite intentional. The bulb opens up and creates a space to prevent the head from spewing up and out of the glass. The bulb also creates a pocket for the aromas to collect. You can then stick your nose into the glass and get a whiff of concentrated the banana, clove or floral aromas or let the aromas spill out into your face as you take a drink. This takes a little practice as you will need to inhale and drink at the same time. Either way, it enhances your drinking experience.

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